Bullet tuna

Bullet Tuna

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Chordata

Class:
Actinopterygii

Order:
Perciformes

Family:
Scombridae

Subfamily:
Scombrinae

Tribe:
Thunnini

Genus:
Auxis

Subspecies:
A. rochei rochei

Trinomial name

Auxis rochei rochei
(Lacepède, 1800)

The bullet tuna, Auxis rochei rochei, is a subspecies of tuna, in the family Scombridae, found circumglobally in tropical oceans in open surface waters to depths of 50 m (164 ft). Its maximum length is 50.0 cm.(20 inches)
Sometimes called bullet mackerel, the bullet tuna is a comparatively small and slender tuna. It has a triangular first dorsal fin, widely separated from the second dorsal fin, which, like the anal and pectoral fins, is relatively small. There are the usual finlets of the tuna. There is a small corselet of small scales around the pectoral region of the body.
Bullet tunas are blue-black on the back with a pattern of zig-zag dark markings on the upper hind body, and silver below. The fins are dark grey.
They feed on small fish, squid, planktonic crustaceans, and stomatopod larvae.
References[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Bullet tuna.

Wikispecies has information related to: Bullet tuna

Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2006). “Auxis rochei” in FishBase. February 2006 version.

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Tuna

True tuna

Tuna
Thunnus
Albacore
Bigeye tuna
Atlantic bluefin tuna
Blackfin tuna
Longtail tuna
Southern bluefin tuna
Pacific bluefin tuna
Yellowfin tuna

Other tuna

Scombridae
Black skipjack tuna
Bullet tuna
Dogtooth tuna
Frigate tuna
Mackerel tuna
Leaping bonito
Little tunny
Skipjack tuna
Slender tuna
Auxis

Fishing and fisheries

Almadraba
US bluefin tuna industry

As food

Botargo
Cakalang fufu
Chūtoro
Katsuobushi
Kezuriki
Mojama
Tekkadon
Tuna casserole
Tuna fish sandwich
Tuna pot
Tuna salad

Other

Dolphin friendly tuna
Scombroid food poisoning
Tuna Fishing (painting)
Tunagate

Organisations

ICCAT
International Seafood Sustainability Foundation#Practices
Nauru Agreement
Regional Fisheries Management Organisation